Monthly Archives: June 2011

Capping the national debt (and the rest)

Over on ConservativeHome yesterday, Sajid Javid MP argued that the Britain should cap its national debt. Next month, he’ll be introducing a National Debt Cap Bill in the House of Commons to this effect. Bravo, Sajid! I’m a big fan … Continue reading

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Clarification on the Police National Database

Last week Anna wrote a piece on ‘The fatal conceit of the Police National Database’. It raised concerns about plans to store the details of 10-15 million people in this database, on the basis that there are only 9.2 million … Continue reading

Posted in Liberty & Justice | Leave a comment

An attractive Danish model (for bank reform)

In his editor’s letter in today’s City AM, Allister Heath outlines the Danish approach to bank reform: BELIEVE IT or not but Denmark has emerged as Europe’s pioneering financial reformer. We need to learn from it. Fjordbank Mors, a small … Continue reading

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The Bank of International Settlements gets it

The BBC reports that the Bank of International Settlements, one of the few major economic institutions to forsee the financial crisis, has warned that monetary policy around the world needs to be normalized and that persistent low interest rates may prove … Continue reading

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Bankers aren’t evil

Today’s FT also contains an interview with Stephen Green, the former chairman of HSBC, who is now a government trade minister. It is for the most part fairly unexceptional stuff – the headline is that Green thinks the banks need to … Continue reading

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The accepted wisdom on Greece

Detlev Schlichter had a great piece on his Paper Money Collapse blog yesterday, in which he argued that Greece should return to the gold standard. But let’s leave that conclusion aside for the moment – what I really liked about … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Money & Banking | Leave a comment

Ed Balls’ suggestion of a temporary VAT cut is pure politics – and bad economics

The Adam Smith Institute is well known for advocating lower taxes to encourage economic growth. So perhaps you’d expect me to be happy that Ed Balls had come around to my way of thinking, and proposed a tax cut to … Continue reading

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